July - December 2005

NATO Must Refocus To Combat Islamic Extremism: Ex-Spanish PM
By AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, WASHINGTON 11/16/05 
Spain's former Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar on Nov. 16 called for a major 
overhaul of NATO, saying the Atlantic alliance needed to focus on combating 
Islamic extremism and must expand to include countries like Japan, Australia 
and Israel. "I do believe we are facing a mortal enemy," Aznar told an audience 
at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative Washington think tank. "And I 
believe those who prefer to see the Islamist terrorists as a problem that can be 
contained are wrong." The former premier, whose conservative Popular Party 
was ousted from office in March 2004 elections, just days following the March 11 
attacks on trains in Madrid, said the North Atlantic Treaty Organization urgently 
needs to rethink its priorities, as it has become "a zombie organization" with no 
focus.  "Jihadism has replaced communism, as communism replaced Nazism as 
an existential threat to liberal democracies," he said.  Aznar, who backed the 
U.S.-led war in Iraq and whose views concerning Islamic terrorism are along the 
same lines as those of the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush, 
said the alliance also must extend beyond Europe in order to be effective. "What 
NATO needs is to expand to reflect better what we are," he said. He noted that 
countries like Japan, Australia and Israel, "all of them at the forefront of fighting 
terrorism," had to be considered when NATO next expands in order to more 
effectively "face this historical challenge." Aznar added that other nations like 
Colombia should also be offered a strategic partnership. His speech was based 
on a study carried out by FAES, a Madrid-based conservative think tank over 
which he presides. 
(Read More)

Aznar urges that NATO expand its geographic scope
2005-11-16 
Former Spanish Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar said Wednesday that 
democracies like Japan, Australia and Israel should be invited to join NATO to 
make the alliance more effective in the fight against terrorism. "In order to win 
this battle against the terrorist evil, NATO must expand its geographical scope," 
Aznar said. 
A "new NATO" must be forged to deal with new realities, he added. Aznar, who 
left office in March 2004, heads a Spanish think tank, FAES, which is linked to 
his Popular Party. He spoke to a gathering at the American Enterprise Institute.  
As prime minister, Aznar won favor here by dispatching Spanish troops to join 
oalition forces in Iraq. But his Socialists successors withdrew them not long after 
taking office.  
A FAES report released at Wednesday's event said that an expanded NATO 
should include countries that not only share democratic values but which are 
"plagued by terrorism and the risks inherent in the proliferation of weapons of 
mass destruction." 
The report said NATO must become the military instrument of democracies in the 
face of the new "totalitarian movements" that are on the offensive.  
"We believe that the best way of doing this is to open up to various countries in 
their fight against terror," it said. "Bringing Israel into the alliance is an extremely 
important step in this respect." In his remarks, Aznar also said it is no longer 
possible to draw a line "between international security and internal or homeland 
security." "We are under attack from outside our borders as well as from within," 
he said.  
He added that NATO should not allow "bureaucratic and corporative vested 
interest" to prevent the alliance to serve as a meeting point for those responsible 
to protecting both homeland security and potential threats from outside. Aznar 
also said that terrorism cannot be separated from the problem of proliferation. 
"We know that Islamists have no red line and are willing to kill as many people as 
they can," he said, informs AP. 

Putin says Russia may consider joining NATO in future
November 01, 2005 People’s Daily Online 
Russian President Vladimir Putin said Russia may considering the question of 
joining NATO, but it has always been able to ensure its security and defence 
capability on its own.  
Responding to a question from Dutch journalists if Russia may become a NATO 
or EU member some time in the future and what is needed for that, Putin said, 
"We are actively developing relations with both organizations, NATO and 
especially the European Union." 
In his words, NATO is undergoing through "certain internal changes" and "we 
need to understand what we are going to join if this becomes relevant, and what 
objectives we will pursue in this organization". Read More  
Putin favors closer NATO, EU ties 
November 1, 2005 
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands, Nov. 1 (UPI) -- Russian President Vladimir Putin 
said his country was developing ties with both NATO and the European Union.  
"We are actively developing relations with both organizations, NATO and 
especially the European Union," he told reporters Monday.(Read More)

Commission adopts new enlargement strategy

November 9, 2005 (Euractiv.com)
”A carefully managed enlargement process" is defined as the Commission's newly adopted strategy goal. A strategy paper approved on 9 November says that "the pace of enlargement has to take into consideration the EU's absorption capacity" and declares that the Commission aims to observe three fundamental principles in this process in the coming years:

  • consolidation: the EU will consolidate its enlargement agenda to make certain that it proceeds with caution when assuming new commitments while observing its existing commitments

  • conditionality: observing a "fair and rigorous conditionality", the EU aims to make sure that the aspirant and candidate countries can only proceed towards eventual membership once they have met the conditions of the stage they are in

  • communication: the EU wants to improve its communication to the citizens on the process of enlargement, which is defined as "one of the EU's most powerful and most successful policy tools"
    (Read More)

Can Variable Geometry Save EU Enlargement?

By Charles Grant, CER
All over Europe , politicians are becoming more hostile to further EU enlargement. One reason is that electorates in many countries oppose it. Another is that the EU's 'widening' has always been closely linked to its 'deepening'. Political elites in core countries such as France have been reluctant to accept a wider Europe , fearing that it would lead to the Thatcherite dream of a free-trade area with weak political institutions. But in the end these elites have agreed to enlargement because successive EU treaties promised further deepening. The end of EU enlargement would be a tragedy. The Union 's greatest success has been the spread of stability, security, prosperity and democracy across most of the continent. Of course, there has to be a geographical limit at some point - North African countries are not in Europe and so cannot join. But for the EU to define precisely its future borders for all time would have a disastrous impact on would-be members beyond those borders. A snub for Turkey would strengthen extreme nationalist and Islamist elements within Turkish politics and society. The impact of the EU shutting the door on the Western Balkans would be worse. Would fragile constructions such as Bosnia and Macedonia hold together? Would Serbia ever swallow the bitter pill of independence for Kosovo without the prospect of EU membership for itself? And if the EU said 'never' to countries further afield, such as Ukraine , Moldova , Belarus and Georgia , how could it hope to influence their development? Despite enlargement's gloomy prospects, Europe 's leaders could, if determined, resuscitate the process. First, they should boost Europe 's economic growth. As long as millions of Europeans are unemployed, or fear for their jobs, they will naturally be reluctant to welcome new EU members and their workers. Second, EU leaders should finally start to explain to electorates that extending the single market and good governance across the continent enhances their prosperity and security. Third, they should make greater use of 'variable geometry' - the idea that not every member-state takes part in every EU policy area. (...)More variable geometry could help enlargement. If the countries that aspire to a 'political union' were able to build avant-gardes in certain policy areas, and thus revive a sense of forward motion, they would be less likely to oppose further widening of the Union . EU governments should also try to persuade EU applicants to accept long derogations or safeguards that would postpone their full participation in some EU policies. Again, that would make enlargement more palatable for some doubters.
(
Read More)

Review of CER/ Institut Montaigne manifesto, UPI,
24 October 2005  
AN AVANT-GARDE FOR INTERNAL SECURITY  
The need for closer EU co-operation to fight terrorism 
By Hugo Brady  

Even the most hardened eurosceptic admits the need for closer EU co-operation 
to fight terrorism, organised crime and illegal immigration. While criminals and 
terrorists can move easily between EU countries, national policemen cannot. EU 
interior ministers, therefore, are trying to find ways of working together more 
effectively on policing and prosecutions.  
In November 2004, EU leaders approved the 'Hague programme'. This package 
includes substantial proposals on police and judicial co-operation which 
governments have promised to implement by 2010. However, the member-states 
are unlikely to meet this deadline under the current decision-making procedures. 
One promising way forward may be for groups of countries to co-operate more 
closely in avant-gardes, in the hope that the more reluctant will follow in due 
course. 
The EU's rules for taking decisions on criminal justice and policing are complex 
and slow moving. Each member-state can both propose legislation and veto 
anything. The institutional machinery is clogged up with a surfeit of proposals that 
often have little support. Turf battles between the Commission, Council of 
Ministers and European Parliament hamper decision-making ev the need for 
closer EU co-operation to fight terrorism, organised crime and illegal immigration. 
While criminals and terrorists can move easily between EU countries, national 
policemen cannot. EU interior ministers, therefore, are trying to find ways of 
working together more effectively on policing and prosecutions.  
In November 2004, EU leaders approved the 'Hague programme'. This package 
includes substantial proposals on police and judicial co-operation which 
governments have promised to implement by 2010. However, the member-states 
are unlikely to meet this deadline under the current decision-making procedures. 
One promising way forward may be for groups of countries to co-operate more 
closely in avant-gardes, in the hope that the more reluctant will follow in due 
course. 
The EU's rules for taking decisions on criminal justice and policing are complex 
and slow moving. Each member-state can both propose legislation and veto 
anything. The institutional machinery is clogged up with a surfeit of proposals that 
often have little support. Turf battles between the Commission, Council of 
Ministers and European Parliament hamper decision-making even more.  
(Read More)

Outside View: EU – US – A Special Relation
October 17, 2005-Fraser Cameron-Oustside View Commentator
When the president of the Commission turns up at the White House Tueday he will be given the red carpet treatment by George W. Bush. There will be a full working session with the U.S. president plus Dick Cheney, Condoleezza Rice and other top officials present followed by a private lunch with spouses. Why did the U.S. president make this important gesture?

It seems clear now that there has been a fundamental reassessment of the importance of the EU at the highest levels in the Bush administration. The first visible manifestation of this change of heart was the visit by President Bush to Brussels in February. As EU ambassador John Bruton noted recently, no one should underestimate the importance of this symbolic visit to the Berlaymont. Second, the president clearly respects Jose Manuel Barroso and considers the Commission an important institution with which to do business. Third, the balance between the EU and NATO in terms of which organisation is more relevant to today's security threats, has swung decisively in the EU's favour.

No part of the American bureaucracy has recognised this more than the new department of Homeland Security. Its first head, Tom Ridge , at the end of his term, lamented that he had not recognised how important the EU was in the fight against terrorism. His successor, Michael Cherthoff, did not make a similar mistake. His first overseas trip was to Brussels and his officials have been to the forefront in pushing for closer transatlantic cooperation in justice and home affairs. Whether dealing with container security, passenger data or money laundering it is the EU that plays a leading role, not NATO.

The top duo at the State Department, Condoleezza Rice and Bob Zoellick, are also well aware of the contribution that the EU can make in helping to meet American strategic interests such as promoting democracy and modernisation in the broader Middle East , Africa and elsewhere. Transatlantic political consultations now cover a vast array of regions, countries and thematic issues. Worth noting are the new consultations on East Asia , which should avoid further misunderstandings like the China arms embargo, and the cooperation in dealing with Iran . The USTR has always recognised the importance of the EU in the trade field and Doha will be high on the agenda at next week's meeting. Now many other parts of the bureaucracy, taking a lead from the top, are beefing up their contacts with the EU. The Pentagon remains somewhat aloof from this trend. It was reluctant to see the EU as a full partner in crisis management but this may change as a result of direct experience in the Balkans, Iraq and Afghanistan . The new U.N. Peace building Commission could be a fruitful area for military and civilian cooperation between the EU and U.S.

The U.S. change of heart is certainly to be welcome but it could and should go a step further. First, the administration needs to convince many sceptics in Congress and Republican think tanks that a strong, united Europe is very much in the best long-term interests of the U.S. Second, it needs to stamp on any attempts at "divide and rule" with EU member states, always a temptation but one that creates distrust and rarely brings any long-term benefits. Third, the US should end its ambivalence towards European integration. A strong, united Europe may, at times, be a critical partner for the world's sole superpower, but it is also the partner that brings more resources to the table than anyone else. A confident Europe would also be better placed to continue its historic task of uniting the continent and stabilising its neighbourhood.

Of course the EU also has to play its part. Member states have to recognise that there is much more to gain than lose by operating a coherent, common policy towards the US . This will not happen overnight given the number of so-called "special relationships" and it will require a change in the mindset of politicians and bureaucrats in the member states. But the U.S. can help here by boosting its relations with the EU as opposed to 25 individual states.

Talk of a new transatlantic treaty is premature for at least two reasons. First, the EU needs time to recover from the shock of the twin referendum defeats. It is highly unlikely that there will be any significant institutional changes in the next two or three years. When the EU does have a foreign minister it will be opportune to revisit this subject. Second, George W. Bush remains highly unpopular in Europe with less than 25 percent of Europeans approving his foreign policy. It would be very difficult to imagine a new treaty relationship while he remains in office.

But there is no need of a treaty now to advance EU-U.S. relations. What is required is a sober assessment of what the EU and U.S. can do together and refrain from unnecessary insults about the shortcomings of each other. Next week, Barroso and Bush can help cement a new EU-U.S. special relationship that will enable the damaged transatlantic ship to steam ahead in less troubled waters.


(Fraser Cameron is a senior advisor at the European Policy Centre and author of a recent book on US foreign policy. He writes here in a personal capacity.
(Read More)

The EU: a Community of Values
CAN VARIABLE GEOMETRY SAVE EU ENLARGEMENT?  
By Charles Grant, CER 
All over Europe, politicians are becoming more hostile to further EU enlargement. 
One reason is that electorates in many countries oppose it. Another is that the 
EU's 'widening' has always been closely linked to its 'deepening'. Political elites 
in core countries such as France have been reluctant to accept a wider Europe, 
fearing that it would lead to the Thatcherite dream of a free-trade area with weak 
political institutions. But in the end these elites have agreed to enlargement 
because successive EU treaties promised further deepening.  
The end of EU enlargement would be a tragedy. The Union's greatest success 
has been the spread of stability, security, prosperity and democracy across most 
of the continent. Of course, there has to be a geographical limit at some point - 
North African countries are not in Europe and so cannot join. But for the EU to 
define precisely its future borders for all time would have a disastrous impact on 
would-be members beyond those borders.  
A snub for Turkey would strengthen extreme nationalist and Islamist elements 
within Turkish politics and society. The impact of the EU shutting the door on the 
Western Balkans would be worse. Would fragile constructions such as Bosnia 
and Macedonia hold together? Would Serbia ever swallow the bitter pill of 
independence for Kosovo without the prospect of EU membership for itself? And 
if the EU said 'never' to countries further afield, such as Ukraine, Moldova, 
Belarus and Georgia, how could it hope to influence their development?  
Despite enlargement's gloomy prospects, Europe's leaders could, if determined, 
resuscitate the process. First, they should boost Europe's economic growth. As 
long as millions of Europeans are unemployed, or fear for their jobs, they will 
naturally be reluctant to welcome new EU members and their workers. Second, 
EU leaders should finally start to explain to electorates that extending the single 
market and good governance across the continent enhances their prosperity and 
security. Third, they should make greater use of 'variable geometry' - the idea 
that not every member-state takes part in every EU policy area. (...)More variable 
geometry could help enlargement. If the countries that aspire to a 'political union' 
were able to build avant-gardes in certain policy areas, and thus revive a sense 
of forward motion, they would be less likely to oppose further widening of the 
Union. EU governments should also try to persuade EU applicants to accept long 
derogations or safeguards that would postpone their full participation in some EU 
policies. Again, that would make enlargement more palatable for some doubters. 
(Read More)

NATO's relations with the United Nations
March 30, 2007 (NATO)
In recent years, cooperation between NATO and the United Nations has developed well beyond their common engagement in bringing peace and stability to crisis-hit regions. Consultations with UN specialized bodies now cover a wide range of issues, including civil emergency planning, civil-military cooperation, combating human trafficking, action against mines, and the fight against terrorism.
(Read More)

NATO's relations with the United Nations

What does this mean in practice?
March 30, 2007 (NATO)
NATO's Secretary General reports regularly to the UN Secretary General on progress in NATO-led operations and on other key decisions of the North Atlantic Council in the area of crisis management and in the fight against terrorism.
(Read More)

Diplomatic Traffic - Washington , DC , USA
Ideally, a democratic consortium to support democratization of the Middle East should reach beyond the Atlantic to include Japan and other democracies. In the long run such activity might be the natural calling of the Community of Democracies. But to this point, the Community has not been sufficiently organized, and events in the Middle East cannot wait for it. In its current form, the Community it is not a wieldy instrument. For now, a consortium to aid Middle Eastern democrats should begin as an Atlantic project but should solicit participation by other key democratic states.

Such a consortium can help Middle Eastern people achieve their aspirations for political freedom. It can thereby diminish the appeal of violent fanatics in that region. And it can refresh the alliance that has seen the great democracies through so many dark moments. The need for it is urgent, the potential benefits immense.
(Read More)

Poll shows most Norwegians favor Norway 's membership in NATO
STOCKHOLM , Sept. 23 (Xinhuanet)
A new survey shows public support for Norway 's membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Norwegian Broadcasting reported on Friday.
(Read More)

NATO and Ukraine kick off intensified staff talks
Sept. 26, 2005 (NATO)
NATO and Ukrainian officials held the first in a series of staff-level talks under the Intensified Dialogue on membership issues and related reforms at NATO Headquarters on 26 September.
(Read More)

NATO and UN to strengthen cooperation
NATO Secretary General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer visited the UN on 19 and 20 September 
to discuss current operations and ideas for enhancing NATO-UN cooperation with 
Secretary General Kofi Annan. (...) 
A more structured relationship 
The two Secretary Generals also discussed ideas for enhancing NATO-UN relations and 
agreed to pursue a deeper and more structured relationship between the two 
organisations. (...) 
"We can, and should do much more together. We should, for example, talk about 
terrorism, and how to fight it most effectively. And we should have strategic discussions, 
on a regular basis, on the future of our shared missions, such as in Afghanistan, " Mr. De 
Hoop Scheffer said of NATO-UN relations in a policy speech at Columbia University. 
(Read More)

U.S. Envoy calls for the end to NATO-EU rivalries
September 23, 2005 (DefenseNews.com)
NATO and the European Union (EU) must establish a much deeper dialogue than in the past to address the wide range of military, political, equipment and funding.
(Read More)

NATO members help U.S. in its Iraq effort
Wednesday, September 21, 2005 (International Herald Tribune, The New York Times)

UNITED NATIONS, New York European countries have overcome their past differences with the United States over Iraq and all 26 NATO members are now providing training and equipment to Baghdad , according to the alliance's secretary general.  ...

... He said that in his meetings at the United Nations he was stressing the need to stay alert to the continuing needs of Afghanistan . ... He said that such things as addressing the narcotics problem, building a judicial system and shaping the police could not be left to NATO and should be addressed by the United Nations, the Group of 8 industrialized nations, the European Union, nongovernmental organizations and major donor countries.

"NATO is there to organize and project stability and security," he said, "but if NATO had to do that in a void because other international organizations turned their faces to other areas, we would not be in an ideal situation."
(Read More)

Russia Emergencies Ministry office opens at NATO, EU
September 20, 2005
MOSCOW , (Itar-Tass) - The Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations has opened its office at NATO and the European Union, director of the international relations department of the ministry Yuri Brazhnikov told reporters on Tuesday. “In cooperation with the Russian Foreign and Defence Ministries we have prepared the whole foundation for sending the ministry representatives to NATO and the European Union,” he said. Brazhnikov specified the emergencies ministry representative to the EU will be Vladimir Kuvshinov and to NATO – Dmitry Lobanov. According to Brazhnikov, the task of these permanent envoys of the ministry to these international organisations is “to promote Russian initiatives aimed at creating the European centre for fighting catastrophes, the Euro Emergencies Ministry, as well as to promote Russian technology on the international market.” “The idea of creating a European air squadron the basis of which may be formed by the Russian amphibious planes Be-200 is being considered already now,” Brazhnikov indicated. “Besides, an agreement has been reached on the opening of a communication line between Brussels and the centre of crisis management of the Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations,” the official added.

According to him, the ministry representative to NATO will also take part in the work of the Euroatlantic disaster response centre created also with assistance of the Russian emergencies ministry

NATO: Safeguarding Transatlantic Security
20/09/2005 - NATO  
Speech by NATO Secretary General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer at Columbia University 

NATO's relations with the United Nations
... In recent years, cooperation between NATO and the United Nations has developed 
well beyond their common engagement in bringing peace and stability to crisis-hit 
regions. Consultations with UN specialised bodies now cover a wide range of issues, 
including civil emergency planning, civil-military cooperation, combating human 
trafficking, action against mines, and the fight against terrorism.
(Read More)

NATO's relations with the United Nations
What does this mean in practice? 
NATO's Secretary General reports regularly to the UN Secretary General on progress in 
NATO-led operations and on other key decisions of the North Atlantic Council in the 
area of crisis management and in the fight against terrorism. 
(Read More)  

DEMOCRACY: The case for transatlantic partnership
Diplomatic Traffic - Washington,DC,USA 
... Ideally, a democratic consortium to support democratization of the Middle East should reach 
beyond the Atlantic to include Japan and other democracies. In the long run such activity might 
be the natural calling of the Community of Democracies. But to this point, the Community has not 
been sufficiently organized, and events in the Middle East cannot wait for it. In its current form, 
the Community it is not a wieldy instrument. For now, a consortium to aid Middle Eastern 
democrats should begin as an Atlantic project but should solicit participation by other key 
democratic states. 
Such a consortium can help Middle Eastern people achieve their aspirations for political freedom. 
It can thereby diminish the appeal of violent fanatics in that region. And it can refresh the alliance 
that has seen the great democracies through so many dark moments. The need for it is urgent, 
the potential benefits immense. 
(Read More)

Poll shows most Norwegians favor Norway's membership in NATO
Xinhua - China 
23 (Xinhuanet) -- A new survey shows public support for Norway's membership in the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Norwegian Broadcasting reported ... 

US Envoy Calls for End to NATO-EU Rivalries
DefenseNews.com - USA 
NATO and the European Union (EU) must establish a much deeper dialogue than in the past to 
address the wide range of military, political, equipment and funding ... 

NATO members help U.S. in its Iraq effort
International Herald Tribune - France  
Warren Hoge The New York Times  
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 

UNITED NATIONS, New York European countries have overcome their past differences with the 
United States over Iraq and all 26 NATO members are now providing training and equipment 
to Baghdad, according to the alliance's secretary general.  ...   
... He said that in his meetings at the United Nations he was stressing the need to stay alert 
to the continuing needs of Afghanistan. ... He said that such things as addressing the 
narcotics problem, building a judicial system and shaping the police could not be left to NATO 
and should be addressed by the United Nations, the Group of 8 industrialized nations, the 
European Union, nongovernmental organizations and major donor countries.  
"NATO is there to organize and project stability and security," he said, "but if NATO had to do 
that in a void because other international organizations turned their faces to other areas, we 
would not be in an ideal situation." (Read More)

NATO and UN to strengthen cooperation
Sept. 19, 2005 (NATO)
NATO Secretary General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer visited the UN on 19 and 20 September to discuss current operations and ideas for enhancing NATO-UN cooperation with Secretary General Kofi Annan. (...)
A more structured relationship
The two Secretary Generals also discussed ideas for enhancing NATO-UN relations and agreed to pursue a deeper and more structured relationship between the two organizations. (...)
"We can, and should do much more together. We should, for example, talk about terrorism, and how to fight it most effectively. And we should have strategic discussions, on a regular basis, on the future of our shared missions, such as in Afghanistan , “Mr. De Hoop Scheffer said of NATO-UN relations in a policy speech at Columbia University. (...)
(Read More)

UN: Possible Deal with NATO as Two Secretary Generals Meet
September 19, 2005
New York , (AKI) - A possible agreement between NATO and the United Nations will be high on the agenda at NATO secretary general Jaap de Hoop Scheffer's meetings in New York on Monday with UN secretary general Kofi Annan ....
"NATO and the UN have shared objectives and issues in peacebuilding and peacekeeping, and de Hoop Scheffer's visit to the UN is a practical opportunity to discuss future collaboration," a NATO spokesman told Adnkronos International (AKI). ...
On Tuesday, de Hoop Scheffer will deliver a speech 'Safeguarding Transatlantic Security' at Columbia University.
(Read More)

After the UN, What?
Ivo Daalder’s new comments on making an Alliance of Democracies work
Sep 15, 2005
…So why not, then, create a global organization that would unite the world's democracies -- an alliance of democracies.  Jim Lindsay and I proposed such an organization some time ago, and now that the UN has proven itself to be an emperor with no clothes, it's time to take a serious look at this idea.  The essence of the concept, as we originally proposed is this:
The Alliance of Democracies would address the main American criticism of institutional multilateralism -- that it gives countries implacably hostile to American values a say in its foreign policy.  What other members of the Alliance would receive in return is more predictability in and influence over America 's behavior. Washington would find it more difficult at home to give the back of its hand to an Alliance of Democracies than to the United Nations.
The first key to making an Alliance of Democracies work is to restrict its membership to countries with entrenched democratic traditions.  The great weakness of the Community of Democracies, an effort launched in Warsaw in 2000 to bring together countries "committed to democracy," is that it cast its net too wide….
(Read More)

How the US wants the United Nations to reform.
At the summit beginning Wednesday, the US will push for changes in the human 
rights arena and in management.  
By Howard LaFranchi | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor  
from the September 13, 2005 edition  
… Given that resistance to change, some experts suggest, the US should try to create a 
"community of democracies" that would promote international action among a group of like- 
minded countries, both developed and developing.  
"No matter what happens [this week], the deeper problems of the UN are not going to be 
solved and, given that, I'd prefer to see the US move its emphasis to an alliance of 
democracies than to remain focused on a universal organization," says Joshua Muravchik, a 
UN expert at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington.  
On human rights issues, for example, such an alliance would not have to deal with a dictator 
among its members. It could hold "more honest debates and investigations of human rights,"Mr. Muravchik says. (Read More)


The Un-U.N.

By JAMES TRAUB 
Published: September 11, 2005 
.... perhaps rather than reconciling ourselves to the U.N.'s inherent limits, we should ask 
whether we can imagine a different kind of institution - one, for example, that looks more like 
NATO, which consists only of members with a (more or less) shared understanding of the 
world order and thus a shared willingness to confront threats to that order. This new body, 
which I will call the Peace and Security Union until someone comes up with a more resonant 
name, would require members to accept, in advance, a set of core principles, including: 
Terrorism must be unambiguously defined and confronted both through police and, where 
necessary, military means; states have a responsibility to protect their own citizens, which in 
turn confers an obligation on the membership to intervene, at times through armed force, in 
the case of atrocities; extreme poverty and disease, which threaten the integrity of states, 
require a collective response.  
Who should be eligible to join? There has been some discussion, mostly in conservative circles, 
of a new organization of democracies 
(Read More)

Bugs in the Commmunity of Democracies
By R J Rummel (08/20/05)  US, EU seek common ground on WTO talks, The Washington 
Post, September 13, 2005  (Read More)

Industry Steps In To Avert NATO, EU Capability Overlaps
By TOM KINGTON, ROME 
Two defense industry associations — one cooperating with NATO and the other with the 
European Union — are to set up a working group to help prevent the organizations from 
doubling up on capabilities, officials said Sept. 19. ...  
“Industry can be a channel of communication between NATO and the EU, suggesting common 
solutions through the ASD and NIAG,” said Peter Collins, who will head the initiative. ... “The 
aim will be to exchange information to avoid problems over commonality,” said Esposito. ... 
Both the European Union and NATO are pushing for their member states to help augment their 
capabilities. ...  
At the conference, both NATO Deputy Secretary-General Alessandro Minuto Rizzo and Gen. 
Raymond Henault, chairman of the alliance’s military committee, ruled out the possibility of 
NATO and the European Union competing to obtain funding from member states.  
The European Defense Agency and ACT “have very similar remits, and transparency between 
the two must be achieved"
(Read More)

See also, An Alliance of Democracies: Our Way or the Highway, by Ivo Daalder, Financial Times , November 6, 2004


Previous page: July - December 2016
Next page: July - December 2008